Books I Can’t Wait to Read in 2020

It’s a new decade! We’re back in the Roaring 20s, folks, and with a new year, comes a new reading goal. Last year, I barely met my Goodreads goal of 70 books, but the last few months were a whirlwind of change, so I’m pretty sure that in 2020, things won’t be quite as hectic and I can easily top that.

Some of my favorite authors have books coming out in 2020: Sarah J. Maas, Ransom Riggs, and Kimberly McCreight, just to name a few AND there are even a few musical memoirs and political non-fiction titles on my list.

What are you looking forward to reading in 2020? Here are my top picks for the first half of the year since many of the fall releases haven’t been announced yet!


Ransom Riggs – The Conference of the Birds

Conference-BirdsThe fifth installment in the Miss Peregrine’s Peculiar Children series, Ransom Riggs continues the story which has now moved to America. While this series has lost some of the charm it once had, the books are still enjoyable reads and I’m looking forward to seeing where the author takes us.

Releases: January 14

 

 

 

Kiersten White – Chosen

Last year, Kirsten White took us back to the world of Buffy the Vampire Slayer with a 41gOetoeHfL._SX329_BO1,204,203,200_new story set in the Buffyverse. It was magical, entertaining and a nostalgic return to a much loved world. Book two finds Nina trying to manage the Watcher’s Castle as she attempts to turn it into a utopia for hurt and lonely demons.

Releases: January 7

 

 

 

Mary Kubica – The Other Mrs.

One of my favorite thriller writers returns with a new mystery set in Maine. Sadie and Other-MrsWill Foust haven’t lived in their new home long when their neighbor is murdered, setting everyone in the small town on edge. Kubica is the queen of twists and her books just keep getting better.

Releases: February 18 

 

 

 

 

Sarah J. Maas – Crescent City

Ok, so this one made my list LAST year because it originally was supposed to come out in the fall. But it got delayed, so it’s making the 2020 list too. And we have a cover and a plot about a half fae, half human who falls in love with an angel. Sarah J. Maas is one of the Crescent-Citybest young adult writers out there, but this one is aimed at an adult audience, so you know the romance is going to be on fire!

Releases: March 3

 

 

 

 

 

Zan Romanoff – Look

Lulu Shapiro’s a social media star. But when a video of her that she didn’t want public gets posted to the Internet, it creates a series of events that lead her to meet 51XQz7KureLCass. But the online fame continues to follow her around, even when she’s trying to find herself and explore a new relationship in an offline way. Zan Romanoff is sort of an under the radar young adult author, but she crafts great realistic fiction stories that often reflect the trends and times we live in.

Releases: March 31

 

 

 

The Jonas Brothers – Blood

I probably don’t read as much non-fiction as I should, but when I do, I love to read music biographies and political stuff. Weird combination, I know. The Jonas Brothers are kind of a guilty pleasure for me. I used to hate them because there was some tension between them and Hanson and if you know me at all, you don’t talk smack about my favorite 41AkISOahNL._SX328_BO1,204,203,200_band. But they’ve buried the hatchet, and let’s face it: the Jonas Brothers made some pretty catchy music. So I’m really interested to read this one and find out some background info on the brothers because siblings really do make the best music together.

Releases: March 17

 

 

 

 

Suzanne Collins – The Ballad of Songbirds and Snakes

Honestly, this title makes me nervous. It’s been quite a while since we’ve had a new Hunger Games book and many times when an author returns to a series after a long hiatus, the new story isn’t any good. Since this is a prequel, it might be interesting to read 46346381._SY475_about some of the events before the Katniss world began, although I would have rather read about the first Hunger Games, not the tenth. Still, it will be a big one in 2020 and I’m intrigued.

Releases: May 19

 

 

 

 

Kimberly McCreight – A Good Marriage

It’s been a while since Kimberly McCreight wrote anything for adults, but her psychological thrillers fill the Gillian Flynn void for me. There’s murder, marriage 417k2BUfO6Lproblems and intrigue as lawyer Lizzie Kitsakis juggles personal problems and a call from an old friend who needs her help. Eagerly awaiting this one.

Releases: May 5

 

 

 

 

 

 

Book Review: Recursion by Blake Crouch

Recursion-cover-1263x1920Helena Smith’s mother is suffering from Alzheimer’s and she wants nothing more than to bring back her mother’s precious memories. So she begins experimenting with a new technology that will preserve special moments in life while also allowing them to relive learning to drive, getting married, the birth of their children or the last few moments with a loved one who is about to pass over into the afterlife.

Through her research and efforts, “the chair” is created. It can send you back to different memories in time, creating new timelines and erasing past mistakes or events. The only problem is, Helena’s boss isn’t using it for the purpose she intended and instead of doing good, her technological advancement is wreaking havoc on the current timeline of the world.

NYC cop Barry Sutton stumbles upon Helena’s invention while investigating False Memory Syndrome – a condition that’s causing people to kill themselves based on memories of lives they never thought they experienced. Unknown to them, their jolting memories, which return to them once they’ve reached the moment in time the original event was altered, are a side effect of someone else in their life using “the chair” to undo some event in the past.

The general public doesn’t know about “the chair” – only Helena and a few other researchers, and their subjects are poached off the street by Helena’s boss, Marcus Slade.

Soon the government will get involved and that opens a whole new Pandora’s Box. They start small by jumping timelines to undo school shootings or horrific criminal acts and soon, top officials want to eradicate past events like the Holocaust.

Recursion is a stellar follow up to sci-fi writer Blake Crouch’s thriller Dark Matter. There’s a lot to keep track of with the shifting timelines, but once you get used to it, it’s not hard understand where our characters are in the story line.

In addition to the face paced writing style, Crouch challenges readers to think about if changing the past really would really be for the moral good and if the human race can ever be trusted to carry that out if the technology is ever invented.

Easily one of the best books I’ve read all year, Recursion should be at the top of your reading list. Netflix has already optioned it for a film/TV series with Shonda Rimes’ production company to produce.

 

Five Books Set in Indiana You HAVE to Read

When you think about the Hoosier state, you probably don’t think about books – after all we’re generally known for the Indianapolis 500, basketball and corn. But there have been some great stories set here and many are by Hoosiers themselves!

Here are five titles set in Indiana that everyone should read.

51wWVHYogWL
Last Words by Michael Koryta

Ten years ago, Sarah Martin, a teenage girl from Garrison, Indiana disappeared inside a rural Indiana cave. Her boyfriend swore she was right behind him, but can’t recall what happened in the inky darkness and ultimately, only one teen emerged that day. No one is able to find her except for Ridley Barnes, a seasoned explorer who surfaced with her lifeless body a few days after the incident.  Barnes has no memory of where or how he found her and everyone in the small town believes he’s responsible for her death. But with no evidence to prove his involvement, the Garrison police department has no choice but to release Barnes.

Markus Novak, a private investigator from Florida, is sent to re-open the case and see if he can solve the ten-year-old mystery of Sarah Martin’s death. He’s not particularly interested in a case that’s gone cold, but his job is on the line and if he can’t prove to his boss that he can work on something other than his own wife’s death, he’ll likely lose his job. But the people of Garrison seem to distrust Novak even more than Barnes and it’s not until Novak himself gets trapped in the cave that the pieces of the puzzle start fitting together.

Written by Bloomington native Michael Koryta, Last Words is a suspenseful and engrossing read that will appeal to fans crime mysteries. Indiana natives will recognize the setting in the book from the Indiana Cave Trail network of caves.

81a4kCNuH+L
The Fault in Our Stars by John Green

Hazel and Gus meet in a support group for kids with cancer, which is not the most romantic of places to find the love of your life.

Yet the two bond over books; one title,  An Imperial Affliction, especially connects them and Gus surprises Hazel with tickets to Amsterdam to meet the author so they can find out why he ended the story the way he did.

Set in Indianapolis, Indiana, The Fault in Our Stars is both delightful and heartbreaking at the same time, painting a very real picture of what life can be like for teens who suffer from cancer.

John Green lives in Indianapolis, which serves as the backdrop for several of his young adult novels. Many of the places in his books are real places in the Circle City and even though the movie version was not filmed here, it can be fun to go looking for all the places Hazel and Gus hung out in the novel.

91WwKZLeiqL

Come and Get Me by August Norman

Award-winning journalist Caitlin Bergman returns to Indiana University to accept an award, and she’s not exactly thrilled to be back in the town that holds some haunting memories from her college years.

When a young college student goes missing, Caitlin become involved in the case and is forced to confront her own trauma, dealing with the same police force that screwed her case up years ago.

Loosely based on the Lauren Spierer case that still remains unsolved today,  Come and Get Me is a must read. Hoosiers will enjoy the setting – all the places in the book are very real, and if you’re familiar with Bloomington at all, you will likely have a clear picture painted in your head as the events in the story unfold.

91nh+RL7nPL
Devil in the White City by Erik Larson

While the World’s Fair is being built in Chicago, H.H. Holmes is building his murder house a few blocks away.

Holmes murdered at least twenty-seven people, defrauded countless others and investigators were horrified to find gas chambers, sound proof rooms and torture tables when they raided his building.

Based on the true story of one of America’s most infamous serial killers, Devil in the White City isn’t set in Indiana for most of the book but it has strong ties to the state.

Holmes’ third wife was from Franklin, Indiana (the town where I work!) and for a short time, lived in Indianapolis while the police were pursing him. Here, he committed one of his last murders in a home in Irvington, and it was a gruesome one.

I included this one since it has strong ties to the Hoosier state and interest should peak in the next few years with the adaptation of the true crime non-fiction title into a Hulu mini series produced by Martin Scorsese and starring Leonardo DiCaprio.

220px-Teen_Idol_(novel)
Teen Idol by Meg Cabot

Jen Greenley is kinda famous – everyone always wants to know what she’s wearing, who she’s with and where she’s going next.

But when the school administration asks her to befriend a new student, who happens to be an undercover Hollywood movie star, she’s about to find out she’s not the only “teen idol” at her high school.

Bloomington, Indiana native Meg Cabot is the GOAT when it comes to YA/teen lit. The author behind book-to-movie classics such as “The Princess Diaries”, her charming and witty style make for light reads.

Teen Idol is set in the Hoosier state and it was also the author’s first stand alone novel after writing several series.

 

 

 

Book Review: Say You’re Sorry

51p8s+2+z3L._SX329_BO1,204,203,200_

Say You’re Sorry by Karen Rose

While walking home one night, Daisy Dawson is attacked, but manages to fight the perpetrator, swiping a necklace and some skin cells off under her nails in the process. What she doesn’t know is that her would be kidnapper is a serial killer, and she’s the only victim that has gotten away.

Daisy has a high profile public job, so it doesn’t take long for her attacker to figure out her identity. Enraged that he wasn’t able to capture her the first time, her assailant begins stalking her and Special Agent Gideon Reynolds, who’s been assigned to protect her.

While he’s stalking her, he’s also kidnapping and murdering other women, collecting necklaces and drivers licenses as trophy pieces once he’s done with them. However, one of his victims isn’t about to give up; she begins memorizing every name and is determined to break out of the prison he has set up in his basement.

As the detectives begin to piece together clues about the case, they uncover details linking the assailant to someone from Agent Reynolds past, and in order to catch a killer, Reynolds and Daisy take off on an interstate adventure that brims with romance, action, murder and mystery.

There’s a little something for everyone in this romantic suspense from Karen Rose and even though it’s over 600 pages, it’s a quick read that you’ll have a hard time putting down.

img_4086.jpg